Saturday, April 30, 2016

Illumination by Manly P. Hall




“Illumination never comes to a person incapable of understanding it or appreciating its significance. It is not unusual for people to go to a teacher of the occult sciences to have their psychic experiences diagnosed and interpreted. One will say, ‘such and such a thing happened to me -was it initiation?’ Another will say, 'I saw some funny lights last night–am I illuminated?’ One rule that all can depend upon is that no one will be illuminated or initiated without knowing it. The reason is evident no one can be initiated until he has reached a state of development in which he is perfectly qualified to decide for himself the significance of his mystical experiences. A person who does not know whether he is illuminated or not very evidently is not, for illumination itself could scarcely fail to clarify this problem for him.”

— Manly P. Hall


Thursday, April 28, 2016

Children's haunting stories of past lives


Many children seem wise beyond their years or like “old souls,” but some have said things that truly seem to hearken back to previous lives.

Parents have shared their stories via social media:

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Memories of Egypt

When my grandson was about two, he started to talk about ‘his other mummy’. He frequently asked when he would be going back to her.

I was quite spooked and didn’t want to mention it to my daughter.

I asked where he had lived and he told me Egypt, in a house made of mud.

When I asked about his ‘other mummy’, he said he did not know what had happened to her because he had been bitten by a snake and died... and he never saw her again.

Eventually, I told my daughter, expecting her to laugh and think it was just his imagination, but she said he had talked to her of his other life.

He continued to mention his past life until he went to school and then it faded away. He is now 12 and cannot remember anything at all about it.

-Margaret

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‘I am buried over there’

Our youngest child, Estelle, was born 16 years after her sister, Virginia, had died in a car crash aged six months.

Estelle looked very similar to Virginia, with big dark eyes and thick black hair.

When Estelle was a year or so old, just beginning to talk, we were driving near the cemetery where Virginia was buried — the first time we had visited the area since Estelle was born.

Out of the blue, from her baby seat, Estelle said ‘I am buried over there’ and pointed towards the cemetery, which could not be seen from the road. We were shocked, and said nothing.

One night, when she was in bed, she looked at me and said, ‘Can I have a wide straw hat and long dress like I had before with my other Mum and Dad?’ I agreed and asked when that was. ‘A long time ago when I lived in a house with a big field of flowers around it.’

-John

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‘We feasted on peacocks’

When our daughter, Ella, was about three, we took her to Caernarvon for the first time. As we drove along and the castle came into view, Ella pointed to it and said: ‘I used to live there! When I was a little girl’.

What followed was an astonishing story of her life in that castle. She talked of big parties with lots of people, roaring fires with huge dogs lying around, of eating peacocks and swans.

She wore a long gown that was too big so she tripped on it, and a crown that would slip down over her eyes.

She talked very freely and confidently, in such fascinating detail, that we were stunned into silence.

-Kirsty

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‘We fly up to see God’

My son, Jamie, must have been about three when he began talking about a little boy called Chris.

I thought it was probably an imaginary friend, as some children have at that age, because he didn’t know any children with that name.

When I asked him about Chris, Jamie said: ‘Chris is a little boy and at night we fly up and see God.’

I thought this was very unusual because my husband and I are not particularly religious.

My mother-in-law then told me that she’d had a brother, who died before she was born. His name was Chris.

I ordered the death certificate and his name was ‘Chris’, rather than ‘Christopher’, and he had died aged four of a childhood illness.

-Barbara

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Home on the farm

Between the ages of about two and three years, my daughter had memories of a past life. She would play games, as I thought, with her six siblings in which she called herself Julia. She would often stand by her bedroom door, calling them in and ushering them to bed.

The most striking episode came one day when she caught sight of a Victorian-style farm on the television, with a flat-back farm wagon driving past.

She became excited, telling me very urgently to look.

‘We had one of they. We had one of they. Before, before when I was Julia,’ she exclaimed.

I was struck by how definite she was, and also by the colloquial use of ‘they’, not ‘them’ or ‘those’. This was not how she would usually phrase something.

-Jill

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‘I used to be my uncle’

From his first marriage, in the early Fifties, my late husband Maurice had a son, who died just before he was three.

Three years ago, I was walking with my grandson, Ben, who was then three-and-a-half.

As he strolled by my side, he suddenly said. ‘My Grandad Maurice used to be my daddy when I was a little boy, and then I died.’

Ben had never met his Grandad and certainly never knew he had a son who died, because we never discussed it.

I asked him how old the boy, Neil, was when he died, and he replied that he was three.

I can only assume Ben is a reincarnation of his late uncle. Ben is now almost seven and no longer remembers anything about it.

-Kate

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Was my boy once a Nazi?

When my son, 52, was three, he would march around doing a Nazi goose-step, saluting and saying ‘Hi Hitler’.

We found this very strange, as there was no way he could have seen or heard anything like this. We didn’t have a TV.

When he was eight he had some teeth out under anaesthetic at the dentist.

My son failed to come round, but the dentist was unperturbed and just told me to put him to bed at home and keep an eye on him. He ‘slept’ for two days, was a healthy colour, and breathing steadily. I had the strong impression that he was somewhere else.

On the third morning he was back, wide awake. ‘Hello, darling,’ I said, ‘where have you been?’
‘Back in the gas chamber with them all,’ he told me.

He married a German girl, speaks fluent German and lives very happily in Frankfurt, working in the finance sector.

He tells me that he loves Germany, and has no desire to live in England.

-Angela

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Tears for a lost wife

My son first mentioned that he had been here in a previous life aged three, saying that he used to be a grown-up man whose wife had died before they had children.

One day in the car, he started crying. When I asked what was wrong, he pointed at a tree and said: ‘That’s where my wife died.’ Apparently she had crashed her car. For a while, he would mention odd details about his previous life, and become frustrated when I told him how to do things because, as he would say: ‘I did it when I was a grown up!’

These past lives are very real for small children.

-Amy

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He knew how to ride

From the age of two-and-a-half, my son, James, would tell us the same story. He had lived in a wooden house with stairs next to a ‘big water’. One day, someone left the door open and he walked out, fell in the water and drowned. He went to heaven, and then he was James.

Aged four, he cried when he saw a horse on the television. He was hitting the screen, saying his horse was waiting, and he had promised it he would go back. He was so upset that I took him to some stables the next day. When a pony was brought out, James knew exactly how to ride, even though he had never even been on a donkey.

A few people I consulted about this all said the same thing. By the age of five he’d stop talking about it, and sure enough he did. It certainly opened my mind and today I am a firm believer in past lives.

-Joanne

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Was she my grandma?

When my granddaughter was two-and-a-half, we were looking at a magazine photograph of a park. She said: ‘That’s like when I was big and you were little, and I took you for walks in your pram.’

I was struck by her use of the word ‘pram’, instead of ‘buggy’. As a baby, we had lived with my paternal grandparents and I was often taken to the park by my grandma.

Shortly after this, she became obsessed with telling me stories about a cat called ‘Asquid’, and I was struck by the unusual name. Several years later I was telling my uncle about Asquid, and he vividly remembered a childhood book about Asquith the cat, which his mum, my grandma, read to him.

-Marilyn

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‘I need to go home’

When my son was about three, he frequently asked if he could go home, I used to tell him he was at home, but he still said: ‘Can I go home now?’

It really used to unsettle me. One day, he told us that he had lived in a cottage in our town about four miles away. We found out it had been demolished many years before he was born — we had never heard of the place so he could not have heard us talk about it. I am a very sceptical person, but this was totally real.

-Mrs S. George

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I cleaned that church’

When my daughter, Charlotte, was three we were in the car, and you couldn’t see the buildings set back from the road.

Charlotte said out of the blue: ‘Remember when I used to clean the windows of the white church down there?’

As it wasn’t the first odd remark Charlotte had made, curiosity got the better of me and I went to where Charlotte had indicated the church was. Sure enough, there was a church, painted white.

I have asked Charlotte about this since, and she has no recollection of any things she may have said.

-Denis

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Salute from little soldier

When Diamond, our daughter, was about two, she would use words so uncommon I had to open the dictionary to find their meanings.

When she saw a new food, she would call out its name. Her mother and I would mutter under our breath: ‘This child has been here before.’

Once when she saw a military parade on TV for the very first time, she screamed ‘Soldiers!’ She jumped out of her seat, stood to attention and gave a perfect salute. The men parading were neither at attention nor giving a salute.

When we asked if she was a soldier in her first life, she smiled and replied coyly: ‘Yes, Daddy. I was in the military before.’

-Ade

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‘When I was a big man’

We have rarely mentioned, for fear of ridicule, the strange responses of my son to learning new skills, and the nightmare that plagued him when he was three.

When we taught him to do things, such as tying his shoelaces, he would constantly tell us: ‘When I was a big man I could do that.’

His recurring nightmare was that he was shot and killed in a pub. Dreadful.

-Kate

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My old daddy was really mean

When my son was 3, he told me that he really likes his new daddy, he’s really nice. My husband is his one and only daddy. I asked ‘Why is that?’

He replied: ‘My old daddy was really mean. He stabbed me in the back and I died. But I really like my new daddy, he’d never do that to me.’

-Anonymous

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Car accident

‘Before I was born here, I had a sister, right? Her and my other mom are so old now. They were OK when the car was on fire, but I sure wasn’t!’

He was maybe 5 or 6 years old. It was totally out of the blue.

-Anonymous

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I miss you

When my little sister was younger, she used to walk around the house with a picture frame with a picture of my great grandpa in her hands crying and saying, “I miss you Harvey.”

Harvey had died before even I was born. Other than this common occurrence, my mom told me that she would constantly say things that my great grandma Lucy would say.

-Anonymous

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Soul mission

Between the ages of 2 and 6, my son would tell me the same story of how he picked me to be his mother.

He said something about being with a man in a suit and picking a mother that would help him accomplish his souls mission... We didn’t discuss spirituality... nor was he raised in any sort of religious environment.

The way he described it was that it was similar to grocery shopping, that he was in a bright room with people who were lined up like dolls, and that he picked me. The man in the suit asked him if he was sure, he replied that he was, and then he was born.

My son also had an early fascination with WWII era planes. He could identify them, their parts, what region they were used in, and the like. I still have no idea where he got that information. I’m a science gal, his dad is a math guy.

We have always called him ‘Grandpa,’ because of his peaceful and gingerly demeanor. This kid seriously has an old soul.

-Anonymous

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Picking parents 

My nephew when he first began really talking in sentences told my sister and her husband that he was ‘so happy he picked them.’ And then went on to say that before he was a baby he was in a bright room and saw lots of people and he ‘picked his Mom because she had a nice face.’

-Anonymous

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Do you believe in past lives? 

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Dream Yoga: Lucid Dreaming in Tibetan Buddhism


Tibetan dream yoga is the original form of lucid dreaming. It is a philosophical practice created in Tibetan Buddhism at least 1,000 years ago. Just like lucid dreams, the aim of this is to awaken the consciousness in the dream state. However, Buddhist monks have more esoteric goals in mind...

Their aim is to harness the power of the lucid dream state and then complete a number of set tasks to take them to the next level. These tasks include:

  • Practice sadhana (a spiritual discipline)
  • Receive initiations, empowerments and transmissions
  • Visit different places, planes and lokas (worlds)
  • Communicate with yidam (an enlightened being)
  • Meet with other sentient beings
  • Fly and shape shift into other creatures

The ultimate goal in Tibetan dream yoga is to "apprehend the dream" (attain conscious awareness) then dissolve the dream state. When you are deprived of physical stimulus (from the sleeping body) and conceptual stimulus (from the dreaming mind), you can observe the purest form of conscious awareness.

That sounds like an excellent goal for any lucid dreamer.

↰ My favorite book: Dream Yoga: Consciousness, Astral Projection, and the Transformation of the Dream State by Samael Aun Weor (find the book on the left bar of this site)


Also read:

What is a Hypersigil?


The “hypersigil” or “supersigil” develops the sigil concept beyond the static image and incorporates elements such as characterization, drama, and plot. The hypersigil is a sigil extended through the fourth dimension. My own comic book series The Invisibles was a six-year long sigil in the form of an occult adventure story which consumed and recreated my life during the period of its composition and execution. The hypersigil is an immensely powerful and sometimes dangerous method for actually altering reality in accordance with intent. Results can be remarkable and shocking.

After becoming familiar with the traditional sigil method, see if you can create your own hypersigil. The hypersigil can take the form of a poem, a story, a song, a dance, or any other extended artistic activity you wish to try. This is a newly developed technology so the parameters remain to be explored. It is important to become utterly absorbed in the hypersigil as it unfolds; this requires a high degree of absorption and concentration (which can lead to obsession but so what? You can always banish at the end) like most works of art. The hypersigil is a dynamic miniature model of the magician’s universe, a hologram, microcosm, or “voodoo doll” which can be manipulated in real time to produce changes in the macrocosmic environment of “real” life.

“Pop Magic” by Grant Morrison from The Disinfo Book of Lies, pg. 20.


← Get the book